National Graphic Novel Writing Month
June 2014

opulentes:

WRITER LIFE

Inspiration and Writer’s Block

MUSIC

SOFTWARE AND TOOLS

Research Organization

Family Trees

Editing

Writing 

Timeline Makers

FORUMS, BOARDS, COMMUNITIES 

WRITING BLOGS

RESEARCH 

Culture

Terminology

Mental Illness

Crime

Survival

Self-Defence And Fighting

Death

Body Language

GENERATORS 

Names

Plots

Prompts

NOVELS

 ROMANCE

Sex

Kissing

WORLD BUILDING

PLOT

CHARACTERS

How To

Archetypes 

Depth

Questionnaires

Names

EDITING AND REVISION

Reference Materials

How To

Synonyms

Editing Services

Grammar

PUBLISHING

Querying

Literary Magazines

Publishing

ACADEMIC

General

Introductions

Body Paragraphs

Topic Sentences

Conclusions

Thesis Statements

Citing

Argumentative Essays

Writing About Poetry

Expository Essays

Research Papers

College Application Essays

Narrative Essays

(via firstenchantervivienne)

scrotumnose:

zanetheaiden:

ashiecrackerr:

So in my basic drawing class we are learning to draw facial features and I couldnt help myself to draw eyes on all the lips

The new Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles movie looks so good

I am crying

(via artist-refs)

I’ve spent my entire career obsessively trying to “learn how to draw” when I should’ve just been drawing. Always thinking “I just need to get a little better… and then I’ll start working on (insert any of a hundred personal projects)”

The fact is that i’ve been good enough since my teens- and would’ve improved so much more rapidly had my study been in the service of any of those projects- and not in the dozens of sketchbooks pilled in my closet.

Lesson: Don’t use “learning” as an excuse to avoid “doing”.

-Shane Glines
Link (via faitherinhicks)

YEP.

(via tonycliff)

(via tonycliff)

maxkirin:

#1: You admire a character for trying more than for their successes.

#2: You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be v. different.

#3: Trying for theme is important, but you won’t see what the story is actually about til you’re at the end of it. Now rewrite.

#4: Once upon a time there was ___. Every day, ___. One day ___. Because of that, ___. Because of that, ___. Until finally ___.

#5: Simplify. Focus. Combine characters. Hop over detours. You’ll feel like you’re losing valuable stuff but it sets you free.

#6: What is your character good at, comfortable with? Throw the polar opposite at them. Challenge them. How do they deal?

#7: Come up with your ending before you figure out your middle. Seriously. Endings are hard, get yours working up front.

#8: Finish your story, let go even if it’s not perfect. In an ideal world you have both, but move on. Do better next time.

#9: When you’re stuck, make a list of what WOULDN’T happen next. Lots of times the material to get you unstuck will show up.

#10: Pull apart the stories you like. What you like in them is a part of you; you’ve got to recognize it before you can use it.

#11: Putting it on paper lets you start fixing it. If it stays in your head, a perfect idea, you’ll never share it with anyone.

#12: Discount the 1st thing that comes to mind. And the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th – get the obvious out of the way. Surprise yourself.

#13: Give your characters opinions. Passive/malleable might seem likable to you as you write, but it’s poison to the audience.

#14: Why must you tell THIS story? What’s the belief burning within you that your story feeds off of? That’s the heart of it.

#15: If you were your character, in this situation, how would you feel? Honesty lends credibility to unbelievable situations.

#16: What are the stakes? Give us reason to root for the character. What happens if they don’t succeed? Stack the odds against.

#17: No work is ever wasted. If it’s not working, let go and move on - it’ll come back around to be useful later.

#18: You have to know yourself: the difference between doing your best & fussing. Story is testing, not refining.

#19: Coincidences to get characters into trouble are great; coincidences to get them out of it are cheating.

#20: Exercise: take the building blocks of a movie you dislike. How d’you rearrange them into what you DO like?

#21: You gotta identify with your situation/characters, can’t just write ‘cool’. What would make YOU act that way?

#22: What’s the essence of your story? Most economical telling of it? If you know that, you can build out from there.

Possibly have posted this before but still really solid advice!

peaceofseoul:

Let me know if you have questions!!!

(via artist-refs)

faitherinhicks:

I won an Eisner.

(crying forever)

Congrats to one of my fave comic artists, Faith Erin Hicks!

cosmic-nerd-angel:

since a lot of you seemed to find my profile drawing tutorial helpful, thought i’d expand on it a bit more. this isn’t a tutorial on how to draw eyes, nose, lips, etc…just basic face anatomy.  

(via artist-refs)

fulbruh:

HOW TO BECOME A GODDAMN MAGICIAN

1. OWN A TABLET PEN

2. PUT IT DOWN FOR TEN SECONDS

3. ABRACADABRA WHERE THE FUCK DID IT GO

I had to break down and buy a replacement pen for my intros, things need a cable attached to the end of them.

whataboutwriting:

Also, do you have any tips on staying focused when writing?
  • Find a workplace. Some people can only work efficiently in certain places. Certain environments will boost your productivity, while others will completely ruin it. Find the places where you’re the most creative and/or when you can find staying focused easier. A place with little distractions will often work better, which brings me to our next point.
  • Eliminate all distractions. We live in a world where there’s too much happening, everywhere, at all times. Make sure you turn off the world while you’re writing. Turn off your phone, turn off the TV, put that book you’re eager to finish away from your sight. Stop checking Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, whatever. StayFocusd is a great tool for this. Check it out.
  • Make time for writing. If you are in a hurry, you’ll be so worried about when you have to go that you won’t be able to concentrate. If necessary, create a schedule and decide on the times you can dedicate exclusively to writing and don’t have to be in a hurry to anything after that. If this works for you, make sure you get done with all your obligations before you sit down to write again.
  • Does music help? It doesn’t help everyone, but it’s useful for some people. There are sounds that help you concentrate and even create a peaceful environment that gets you in the perfect mood to write. Here’s a playlist and here’s a website full of sounds that can work as ambient music. 
  • Take breaks. Studies show that people who take breaks can be a lot more productive, as concentration sort of wears out after a while if you don’t rest. Don’t try to write everything at once. Find how much time you can write without feeling tired and, when you do, don’t be afraid to take a break and enjoy a cup of coffee or a cup of tea. 

For further reading:

All good tips that can definitely be applied to drawing.

(via writeworld)